Preparing the Shofar for Rosh Hashanah

Roei Ben Simon drill into a horn at his workshop in Jerusalem, on September 7, 2016. The shofar is used mainly on the Rosh Hashanah holiday, the Jewish New Year and Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It is blown in synagogues to mark the end of the fast at Yom Kippur and on four different occasions in the prayers on Rosh Hashanah which begins on October 2 at sunset. Photo by Yonatan Sindel/Flash90 *** Local Caption *** øàù äùðä ú÷éòä ùåôø ùåôøåú îôòì òåáã øåòé áï ñéîåï
Ro’i Ben-Simon drills into a shofar at his workshop in Yerushalayim, on Wednesday. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

As we blow the shofar every day in the month of Elul as a wakeup call and a reminder to prepare for the upcoming Yemei Hadin, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, let’s have a look at the preparation of the actual shofaros – to ensurethey are kosher, with no flaws or holes, and that they will emit a call that rouses us to teshuvah.

Roei Ben Simon polishe horn at his workshop in Jerusalem, on September 7, 2016. The shofar is used mainly on the Rosh Hashanah holiday, the Jewish New Year and Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It is blown in synagogues to mark the end of the fast at Yom Kippur and on four different occasions in the prayers on Rosh Hashanah which begins on October 2 at sunset. Photo by Yonatan Sindel/Flash90 *** Local Caption *** øàù äùðä ú÷éòä ùåôø ùåôøåú îôòì òåáã øåòé áï ñéîåï
Polishing the shofar. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)
Roei Ben Simon examines a shofar at his workshop in Jerusalem, on September 7, 2016. The shofar is used mainly on the Rosh Hashanah holiday, the Jewish New Year and Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It is blown in synagogues to mark the end of the fast at Yom Kippur and on four different occasions in the prayers on Rosh Hashanah which begins on October 2 at sunset. Photo by Yonatan Sindel/Flash90 *** Local Caption *** ראש השנה תקיעה שופר שופרות מפעל עובד רועי בן סימון
The finished product. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)