Federal Judges Says University Can Mandate Covid Vaccines

NEW YORK -

A federal judge uphold Indiana University’s policy that required students to receive Covid-19 vaccinations before returning to campus in September, CNN reported.

Judge Damon Leichty issued a 101-page ruling against eight students who had  filed a lawsuit claiming the schools vaccine policy was unconstitutional and violated the 14th Amendment.

“Recognizing the students’ significant liberty to refuse unwanted medical treatment, the Fourteenth Amendment permits Indiana University to pursue a reasonable and due process of vaccination in the legitimate interest of public health for its students, faculty, and staff,” the ruling said.

Indiana University first announced its vaccine mandate in June, and that all staff, students, and teachers must be vaccinated in order to attend fall semester.

“A ruling from the federal court has affirmed Indiana University’s COVID-19 vaccination plan designed for the health and well-being of our students, faculty and staff,” the university said in a statement.

Leichty’s ruling noted the historical precedent in Indiana’s public school system, which requires all students be vaccinated for diphtheria, tetanus, measles, mumps, and rubella before attending school.

He also said that the university does allow for religious or medical exemptions to vaccines, therefore providing “multiple choices, not just forced vaccination.”

___

smarcus@hamodia.com