Soccer Plane in Colombia Crash Was Running Out of Fuel

LA UNION, Colombia/CHAPECO, Brazil (Reuters) -
Rescue workers place the bodies of victims of the plane crash into a waiting helicopter, in La Union, near Medellin, Colombia, on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Luis Benavides)
Rescue workers place the bodies of victims of the plane crash into a waiting helicopter, in La Union, near Medellin, Colombia, on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Luis Benavides)

The pilot of a plane that crashed in Colombia virtually wiping out a Brazilian soccer team had radioed he was running out of fuel and in an emergency, according to a recording of his final communications.

Monday night’s disaster killed 71 people and sent shock waves round the global soccer world.

Only six on board the LAMIA Bolivia charter flight survived.

“Miss, LAMIA 933 is in total failure, total electrical failure, without fuel,” the Bolivian pilot Miguel Quiroga is heard telling a control tower operator at Medellin airport on the crackly audio played by Colombian media.

“Fuel emergency, Miss,” he added, requesting urgent permission to land.

That matched the account from the co-pilot of an Avianca plane flying close by at the time who said he overheard the LAMIA plane reporting it was out of fuel and had to land.

“Mayday mayday … Help us get to the runway … Help, help,” Juan Sebastian Upegui described the LAMIA pilot as saying in an audio message also played by local media.

“Then it ended … We all started to cry.”

Alfredo Bocanegra, head of the Civil Aviation Authority, said the recordings could be used as part of the investigation, and Upegui could be called as a witness.

The BAe 146, made by BAE Systems Plc, slammed into a mountainside. Besides the three players, a journalist and two crew members survived.

One survivor, Bolivian flight technician Erwin Tumiri, said he only saved himself by strict adherence to security procedures, while others panicked.

“Many passengers got up from their seats and started yelling,” he told Colombia’s Radio Caracol.

“I put the bag between my legs and went into the fetal position as recommended.”

Bolivian flight attendant Ximena Suarez, another survivor, said the lights went out less than a minute before the plane slammed into the mountain, according to Colombian officials in Medellin.

Three of the six survivors were members of the soccer team.

Goalkeeper Jackson Follmann was recovering from the amputation of his right leg, doctors said. Another player, defender Helio Neto, remained in intensive care with severe trauma to his skull, thorax and lungs. Defender Alan Ruschel had spinal surgery.

Suarez and Tumiri were shaken and bruised but not in critical condition, medical staff said, while journalist Rafael Valmorbida was in intensive care for multiple rib fractures that partly collapsed a lung.

Investigators from Brazil have joined their Colombian counterparts to check two black boxes from the crash site on a muddy hillside in wooded highlands near the town of La Union.

Bolivia, where LAMIA is based, and the United Kingdom also sent experts to help the probe.

The plane “came over my house, but there was no noise,” said Nancy Munoz, 35, who grows strawberries in the area. “The engine must have gone.”

Rescuers have recovered all of the bodies, which are to be sent to Brazil and Bolivia.

All of the crew members were Bolivian.

Forty-five of the bodies have been identified, Colombian officials said.

Since there was no fire on board, bodies are being identified by fingerprints, Julio Bitelli, Brazil’s ambassador to Colombia, told Reuters.

“There’s no need for family members to come,” he said.

“If they want to come, that’s an individual decision that we respect, and we will give all the support needed.”

He said returning the bodies to Brazil was complicated by the number of victims, but air force planes were ready to take them from Medellin direct to Chapeco, in remote southern Brazil.

Flowers are delivered to the Atanasio Girardot stadium in Medellin, Colombia, on Wednesday, for an evening memorial service to honor the plane-crash victims. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)
Flowers are delivered to the Atanasio Girardot stadium in Medellin, Colombia, on Wednesday, for an evening memorial service to honor the plane-crash victims. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

Brazil declared three days of mourning.

In the small city of Chapecó in remote southern Brazil, black and green ribbons were draped on fences, balconies and restaurant tables. Schools cancelled classes, and businesses closed.

“It’s a miracle,” Flavio Ruschel, the father of Alan Ruschel, told Globo News as he prepared to fly to Colombia. “I don’t think I’ll be able to speak, just hug him and cry a lot.”

Black banners hung from a cathedral downtown and wrapped around a 14-meter statue of one of the town’s founding explorers.