Feds Seek Autopilot Data From Tesla in Crash Probe

DETROIT (AP) -
In this 2015 photo provided by his neighbor, Krista Kitchen, Joshua Brown stands by his new Tesla electric car near his home in Canton, Ohio. Brown died in an accident in Florida on May 7, 2016 in the first fatality from a car using self-driving technology. According to statements by the government and the automaker, his vehicle's cameras didn't make a distinction between the white side of a turning tractor-trailer and the brightly lit sky while failing to automatically activate its brakes. (Krista Kitchen via AP)
In this 2015 photo provided by his neighbor, Krista Kitchen, Joshua Brown stands by his new Tesla electric car near his home in Canton, Ohio. Brown died in an accident in Florida on May 7, the first fatality from a car using self-driving technology. (Krista Kitchen via AP)

Federal safety investigators are asking electric car maker Tesla Motors for details on how its Autopilot system works and why it failed to detect another vehicle in a Florida crash.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration also requests in a letter to Tesla data on all crashes that happened because its system did not work as expected.

The agency is investigating the May 7 crash in Williston, Florida, that killed 40-year-old Joshua Brown, of Canton, Ohio. Tesla says the cameras on his Model S sedan failed to distinguish the white side of a turning tractor-trailer from a brightly lit sky and didn’t automatically brake.

The agency gave Tesla until Aug. 26 to fully comply with its request. The company faces penalties of up to $105 million if it doesn’t comply.