Rare Inscription to Hadrian Unveiled

YERUSHALAYIM (Hamodia Staff) -
A rare stone fragment with Latin words, discovered in Yerushalayim, on display at the Rockefeller Museum of Jerusalem, Tuesday. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)
A rare stone fragment with Latin words, discovered in Yerushalayim, on display at the Rockefeller Museum of Jerusalem, Tuesday. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

A rare fragment of a stone engraved with an official Latin inscription dedicated to the Roman emperor Hadrian, discovered in Yerushalayim in July by the Antiquities Authority, was unveiled at the Rockefeller Museum in the capital on Tuesday morning.

The relic, believed to be from the Roman period, is considered to be among the most important Latin inscriptions ever discovered in Yerushalayim.

“This is very rare,” said Dr. Rina Avner, who led the IAI’s excavation north of Damascus Gate, standing a few feet from the antiquity, which was displayed on a grass enclosure at the museum’s entrance. “We found the inscription incorporated in secondary use around the opening of a deep cistern.”

The fragment of the inscription is thought to be the right half of a complete inscription, the other part of which was discovered nearby in the late nineteenth century.

The events of the Bar Kokhba revolt are ascribed to the reign of the emperor Hadrian. He is remembered in Jewish history for having issued dictates imposing the persecution and forced conversions of Jews, referred to as the “Hadrianic decrees.”