Iraq Announces Offensive Against al-Qaida

BAGHDAD (AP) -
Iraqi security forces and Iraqi Sunni Muslim tribesmen deploy during a patrol in Ramadi Sunday. (REUTERS/Ali al-Mashhadani)
Iraqi security forces and Iraqi Sunni Muslim tribesmen deploy during a patrol in Ramadi Sunday. (REUTERS/Ali al-Mashhadani)

Iraqi government forces and allied tribal militias launched an all-out offensive Sunday to push al-Qaida terrorists from a provincial capital, an assault that killed or wounded some 20 police officers and government-allied tribesmen, officials said.

Since late December, members of Iraq’s al-Qaida branch — known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant — have taken over parts of Ramadi, the capital of the largely Sunni western province of Anbar. They also control the center of the nearby city of Fallujah, along with other non-al-Qaida groups that also oppose the Shiite-led government.

A military officer and two local officials said fierce clashes raged through Sunday night in parts of Ramadi, but gave no details.

Later, the commander of Anbar operations, army Lt. Gen. Rasheed Fleih, said that Iraqi special forces retook al-Bubali village following fierce clashes with the terrorists who had held it for about three weeks. Al-Bubali lies on the road between Ramadi and Fallujah.

Fleih said that gunmen had booby-trapped several houses in the village before their retreat. He declined to give any figures regarding casualties.

The two Anbar officials said 20 police officers and allied tribesmen were either killed or wounded during the assault. The officials were unable to provide a breakdown of the casualties.

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who heads the al-Qaida group in Iraq, urged Iraqi Sunni Muslims to join the terrorists in an audio message posted on militant websites Sunday.

Violence has escalated in Iraq over the past year, particularly since late last month after authorities dismantled an anti-government Sunni protest camp and arrested a Sunni lawmaker on terrorism charges. To alleviate the tension, the army pulled back from Fallujah and Ramadi, but that allowed al-Qaida to seize control.