The Odd Side – May 9, 2017

Komodo Dragon Bites Singaporean Tourist In Indonesia

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) – A Komodo dragon has bitten an overly inquisitive tourist in Indonesia who ignored warnings about getting too close to the enormous reptile while it was eating, a national park official said.

The tourist from Singapore was bitten on his leg Wednesday morning while taking pictures of the Komodo dragon, the world’s largest lizard, said the chief of the Komodo National Park, Sudiyono.

Sudiyono said the man was rescued by locals and rushed to a hospital in Labuan Bajo on Flores Island, near Komodo Island, for treatment.

Endangered Komodo dragons are found in the wild on several eastern Indonesian islands. They can grow to 3 meters (10 feet) or more in length.

Attacks on humans are rare but may increase as Indonesia is promoting the Komodo National Park as a tourist destination. In 2013, a guide and a park ranger were attacked in separate incidents.

Dispatcher Heard Snoring on 911 Call Suspended for Six Days

CLEVELAND (AP) – A Cleveland police dispatcher heard snoring on a recorded 911 call has been suspended for six days for sleeping on the job.

WJW reports Jasmin Thomas pleaded no contest to internal charges from the department’s investigation.

The local police union president, Steve Loomis, says Thomas is a single mother who was working full-time and attending college. Loomis says those aren’t excuses but the reality of Thomas’ situation, and the concerns about her sleeping on duty have led her to change her lifestyle.

On one recorded call, Thomas answers but no caller speaks, and then Thomas is heard snoring. In another call about a burning stove, Thomas takes 10 seconds to answer and 40 seconds more to transfer to firefighters.

The police chief declined an interview to discuss the matter.

In Dairy-Obsessed Wisconsin, Plan Just Too ‘Gouda’ to Fail

MADISON, Wis. (AP) – The plan was too “gouda” to fail.

The Wisconsin Legislature agreed Tuesday to make cheese the official dairy product of the dairy-obsessed state, which produces more 3 billion pounds of cheese per year. That’s more than any other U.S. state.

The state’s official animal is the badger, also the mascot of the University of Wisconsin. But its official domestic animal is the dairy cow, and milk is the official state beverage.

The idea to give cheese its proper place in state designations came from a fourth-grade class in Mineral Point, a city in southwest Wisconsin that’s home to one of the state’s nearly 150 cheese plants.

The Senate approved the measure Tuesday. The bill previously cleared the state Assembly, and Republican Gov. Scott Walker is expected to sign it.