Odd Side – March 12, 2019

Teacher Wins $10K for Reading Fine Print in Insurance Policy

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — A Florida insurance company has awarded a Georgia high school teacher $10,000 for reading the fine print in a policy she recently purchased. Andrews teaches consumer economics. A Squaremouth statement says Donelan Andrews claimed the prize 23 hours after the contest began.

The St. Petersburg-based company says it launched the secret contest February 11. Buried in the fine print was a promise of $10,000 for the first person to send an email to a specific address.

Andrews says she applied for retirement a week before winning the contest. The prize will fund a trip to Scotland with her husband to celebrate their 35th wedding anniversary.

Germany: Woman Cries ‘Murder’ Over Car Blocking Garage

BERLIN (AP) — German police say officers called to investigate a murder arrived to find that the woman who had reported it just wanted someone to remove a car blocking her garage.

The woman, who wasn’t named, rang emergency dispatchers early Thursday and claimed that her husband had been killed, sending police and first responders rushing to the scene in the Bavarian town of Berchtesgaden.

German news agency dpa quoted a spokesman for southern Upper Bavaria police, Stefan Sonntag, saying: “The woman thought, if she calls in a murder, the police will get there faster.”

The woman, who was visibly drunk, attempted to get into her car before officers took away her keys.

She can expect a hefty bill and a criminal investigation for misusing the emergency number.

Cat That Lived 6 Years in Alaska General Store Gets Evicted

HOMER, Alaska (AP) — A cat named Stormy that has spent more than six years as a fixture in a remote Alaska general store is being forced out after officials notified the store owners that the cat’s presence violates food safety standards.

The Fritz Creek General Store near the small city of Homer has been home for Stormy since 2012, The Homer News reported Thursday.

The slightly overweight black cat often lounges on one of the store’s wooden chairs or solicits customers for a scratch on her head.

The state Food Safety and Sanitation Program received a complaint about Stormy and an environmental health officer saw the cat in the store, said Jeremy Ayers, section manager for the agency.

State food safety code prohibits pets in facilities that serve food, except for police dogs and service animals.

Enforcement of the pet prohibition is not usually high on officials’ priorities list, but the complaint and the officer’s observation meant that action needed to be taken, Ayers said.

“Stormy is part of the store’s and the rural community’s culture,” said Linda Chamberlain, who frequents the general store. “Several people visit the shop just to greet the cat,” she said.

“Certain regulations may work in Alaska metropolitan areas like Anchorage, but they do not always account for special circumstances in other places,” Chamberlain said.

“Stormy might even make the store more hygienic,” said Al Breitzman, a Fritz Creek regular, who said the cat helps reduce the rodent population.

The general store is owned by Sean Maryott and Diana Carbonell. They didn’t return the newspaper’s call seeking comment.

Sean Maryott’s sister, Bridget Maryott, said Stormy will live with her family.

Animal Saved From Icy Estonian River Turns Out to Be a Wolf

HELSINKI (AP) — Estonian construction workers got the shock of their lives when they found out the animal they saved from an icy river was not a dog but a wolf.

Rando Kartsepp, Robin Sillamae and Erki Vali told the Postimees newspaper they were working at the Sindi dam on the frozen Parnu River in southwestern Estonia when they saw an animal frantically swimming in a maze of ice.

They rescued the ice-coated animal and took it to a shelter. A hunter told them it was about a one-year-old male wolf suffering from shock and hypothermia.

The young wolf recovered after a day and was released back into the wild with a GPS collar.

Estonia has an estimated 200 wolves. The grey wolf was voted Estonia’s national animal by nature organizations in 2018.