The Odd Side – August 7, 2018

New Delhi Robbers Escape With Valuable Commodity: Hair

NEW DELHI (AP) – Posing as customers, the three men entered a little New Delhi workshop early one morning. Then one pulled out a gun, and the trio demanded the most valuable thing there: Hair.

They fled a half-hour later with 500 pounds of wigs and raw hair worth more than $20,000, police said Thursday.

They left behind a wig-maker deep in debt.

“People think wigs are cheap but they cost a fortune to make,” Jahangir Hussain told The Indian Express newspaper after the robbery last Friday. He said he had borrowed more than $17,000 to buy hair last month from South Indian wholesalers.

“We breathe life into dead hair,” said Hussain, who proudly says his wigs can last a decade if they are cared for properly.

Hair is big business in India, estimated to bring in more than $300 million a year, with wigs and hair extensions exported around the world. Much of the hair is collected at Hindu temples in South India. The best-known temple for tonsuring, as the practice is known, in the town of Tirupati, collects hundreds of tons of hair every year, auctioning it off for millions of dollars.

Colorado Man Fined $1K for Repeatedly Feeding Bears

DURANGO, Colo. (AP) – A Colorado man has been fined $1,000 for intentionally feeding bears for the third time in the past eight years.

The Durango Herald reports a resident reported to Colorado Parks and Wildlife that they had seen a man leaving out food in his backyard for bears.

Wildlife Manager Matt Thorpe says the resident took pictures and provided them to officials.

An investigation found that the man had previously been fined for the same behavior in 2010 and 2012.

In Colorado, it’s illegal to knowingly feed bears.

The first offense carries a $100 fine. The second violation gives a $500 fine.

Thorpe said Colorado Parks and Wildlife contacted the man on Sunday, who paid the fine on the spot.

He can be fined another $1,000 if he breaks the law again.

Ready, Steady, Slow: Snails Slug It Out at Racing World Championship

CONGHAM, England (Reuters) – The race starter stood up and shouted: “Ready, steady, slow!” The crowd cheered, but the competitors remained stuck at the start line. Welcome to the world snail racing championship.

More than 150 snails took part in the annual event, held at a summer fete in Norfolk, eastern England on Saturday, where a silver tankard stuffed with lettuce leaves was the prize.

The snails are placed on a special damp cloth marked with three concentric circles and the creatures race 13 inches to the outer ring.

“We take this seriously,” snail racer John McClean told Reuters.

“We have got training slopes. We look at diet, we are drug compliant as well. It is the whole thing when you look at elite sports.”

The competition has been held since the 1960s with each race lasting several minutes. Competitors are able to select a snail from the organizers’ stash or bring their own.