Odd Side – August 14, 2018

School Demolition Crews Unearth 124-Year-Old Time Capsule

SWAMPSCOTT, Mass. (AP) – Construction crews tearing down a former middle school in Massachusetts have found a 124-year-old time capsule.

The Daily Item reports crews found the time capsule under one of the front steps of the former Swampscott Middle School.

The capsule is dated April 28, 1894, the day the school was dedicated. It contains two newspapers, remnants of military uniforms from the Civil War, a war medal and names of locals who served in the war.

Planning Board chairwoman Angela Ippolito says they were aware the time capsule existed but weren’t sure where it was located. She says the discovery was “quite a thrill.”

The items are now heading to the Northeast Document Conservation Center for assessment.

Colorado College Reprinting Up To 9.2K Diplomas to Fix Typo

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (AP) – A Colorado university is offering to reprint up to 9,200 diplomas after the outgoing editor of the school newspaper found a big typo.

Alec Williams was checking to make sure his name was spelled correctly on his Colorado Mesa University diploma when he noticed it said “Coard of Trustees” instead of “Board of Trustees” in Old English font.

Williams told The Daily Sentinel he laughed, but then got frustrated because he had $30,000 in student loans and a diploma with a typo.

CMU President Tim Foster says the university is sending corrected diplomas to 2018 graduates and will offer them to graduates as far back as 2012. They cost $5 each, so the university could spend nearly $46,000.

Foster says CMU designs its diplomas “so this mistake is all ours.”

Vermont City Employs Goats to Get Rid of Poison Ivy

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) – Vermont’s capital city is trying a natural way to get rid of poison ivy — grazing goats.

On a recent Wednesday, three goats munched on the plants along the small city’s bike path behind the high school and near a river.

The goats graze on the poison ivy, causing stress to the plants so that they retreat, said the goat’s owner Mary Beth Herbert, of Moretown. It’s expected to take several years of cyclical grazing to eradicate the poison ivy, she said.

Herbert brought the 6-month-old Kiko goats in her Subaru, and enclosed them in fencing where they grazed while an occasional bicyclist passed by. The poison ivy doesn’t harm the goats, she said.

The poison ivy has been so bad this year that the city posted signs warning bikers and walkers about it.

“The city did not want to ramp up to chemical treatments for many reasons, including the fact that the path runs next to the river, and young children and dogs might get over into the undergrowth,” said assistant city manager Susan Allen.

“I love that we’ve gone back to an old fashioned solution — a shepherd and her goats — to our modern-day problem,” Allen said.