This Day in History – 7 Elul/September 2

Shaar blatt of sefer Toras Chessed.
Shaar blatt of sefer Toras Chessed.

In 2450/1311 B.C.E., the Meraglim died in the Midbar. They suffered a plague, became sick and were niftar on 7 Elul. A taanis tzaddikim was established for this day, which commemorates the fact that they did not merit the acceptance of their teshuvah.

In 3802/42 C.E., Agrippa I dedicated the wall around Yerushalayim. The day is mentioned as a Yom Tov in Megillas Taanis.

In 5608/1848, the Jews of Hanover, Germany, were granted civil equality.


 

Yahrtzeiten

5637/1877, Harav Mordechai of Ostilla, zt”l

5731/1971, Harav Reuven Margulies, zt”l, mechaber of Margalios Hayam and many other sefarim

5739/1979, Harav Arye Leib Lopian, zt”l, Rosh Yeshivah of Gateshead, England


 

5438/1678, Harav Chisdai Perachyah of Salonika, zt”l, mechaber of Toras Chessed

Harav Chisdai Hakohen Perachyah was the son of Rav Shmuel. He was born c. 5365/1605.

He was a talmid of Harav Chaim Shabsi, mechaber of She’eilos U’Teshuvos Maharchash.

Rav Chisdai was one of the leading Rabbanim of Salonika. A posek, he wrote chiddushim on Choshen Mishpat and She’eilos U’Teshuvos Toras Chessed (the word chessed is a play on his name, Chisdai) as well as on some masechtos of Shas. Other works of Rav Chisdai were never published.

Among his well-known talmidim were Harav Aharon Hakohen Perachyah and Harav Yaakov Di Bitton.

After the petirah of Harav Menachem Shulam in 5431/1671, Rav Chisdai was appointed Chief Rabbi of Salonika, a position he held until his petirah on 7 Elul 5438/1678.

Zecher tzaddik livrachah.


 

The wreckage of an 11-car passenger train that was derailed by a Labor Day hurricane in the Florida Keys, 1935. The Hurricane Center said no wind measurements were available from the core of this small but “vicious” hurricane, which was a Category 5 storm when it reached the Florida Keys. But a pressure measurement made it the most intense hurricane ever to make landfall on the U.S. mainland. It was blamed for 408 deaths and caused an estimated $6 million (1935 dollars) in damage.  (AP Photo, File)
The wreckage of an 11-car passenger train that was derailed by a Labor Day hurricane in the Florida Keys, 1935. The Hurricane Center said no wind measurements were available from the core of this small but “vicious” hurricane, which was a Category 5 storm when it reached the Florida Keys. But a pressure measurement made it the most intense hurricane ever to make landfall on the U.S. mainland. It was blamed for 408 deaths and caused an estimated $6 million (1935 dollars) in damage. (AP Photo, File)

September 2

In 1666, the Great Fire of London broke out.

In 1789, the United States Treasury Department was established.

In 1864, during the Civil War, Union Gen. William T. Sherman’s forces occupied Atlanta.

In 1901, Vice President Theodore Roosevelt offered the advice “Speak softly and carry a big stick,” in a speech at the Minnesota State Fair.

In 1935, a Labor Day hurricane slammed into the Florida Keys, claiming more than 400 lives.

In 1944, during World War II, Navy pilot Lt. (jg) George Herbert Walker Bush was shot down by Japanese forces as he completed a bombing run over the Bonin Islands. (Bush was rescued by the crew of the submarine USS Finback; his two crew members, however, died.)

In 1945, Japan formally surrendered in ceremonies aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, ending World War II.

Ho Chi Minh declared Vietnam an independent republic. (Ho died on this date in 1969.)

In 1964, one of America’s most decorated military heroes of World War I, Medal of Honor recipient Alvin C. York, died in Nashville at age 76.

In 1998, a Swissair MD-11 jetliner crashed off Nova Scotia, killing all 229 people aboard.