This Day In History 2 Tamuz/July 8

The kever of Rav Nachman of Horodenka in Eretz Yisrael.
The kever of Rav Nachman of Horodenka in Eretz Yisrael.

2 Tammuz

In 4856/1096, the Crusaders arrived in the city of Weltzk, assembled all the Jews and led them to their deaths. Hy”d.


Yahrtzeiten

2310/1451 B.C.E., according to most opinions, Yosef Hatzaddik. He was also born on this date, in 2200/1561 B.C.E. According to other opinions, he was niftar on 27 Tammuz.

5525/1765, Harav Nachman of Horodenka, zt”l

5625/1865, Harav Mordechai Zev Itinga, zt”l, mechaber of Mefarshei Hayam

5649/1889, Harav Avraham Twersky, zt”l, the Trisker Maggid

5678/1918, Harav Eliezer Nissen of Dzikov, zt”l


5525/1765

Harav Nachman of Horodenka, Zt”l

Rav Nachman was a close colleague of the Baal Shem Tov. His son, Rav Simchah, married the Baal Shem Tov’s daughter, Udel. Their son, the famed Rav Nachman of Breslov, became the founder of Breslov Chassidus.

The Baal Shem Tov once asked Rav Nachman to deliver a letter to Rav Dov Ber of Mezritch (who later became known as the Mezritcher Maggid), in which he attempted to persuade him to become a Chassid. Upon receiving the letter, Rav Dov Ber said, “I see an auspicious sign in the student who bears this letter. If Rav Nachman is such a holy tzaddik, how much more so is his teacher, the Baal Shem Tov.” Rav Dov Ber then agreed to meet with the Baal Shem Tov and later joined the Chassidic movement.
In 1764, he immigrated to the Holy Land and settled in Teveria.

The following year (5525/1765), he was niftar and buried there.

Zechuso yagen aleinu.


The Wall Street Journal’s first edition.
The Wall Street Journal’s first edition.

July 8

In 1663, King Charles II of England granted a Royal Charter to Rhode Island.

In 1776, Col. John Nixon gave the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence, outside the State House (now Independence Hall) in Philadelphia.

In 1870, Congress authorized registration of trademarks.

In 1889, The Wall Street Journal was first published.

In 1941, all Jews living in Baltic States were obligated to wear a Jewish Star.