Uproar Over Video of Police Pulling Toddler From Mom

NEW YORK (AP) -

Outrage built Monday over a video showing police officers violently yanking a toddler from his mother’s arms at a Brooklyn food stamp office, with public officials expressing horror and clients of the facility complaining it is indicative of how the city treats social-services recipients.

A witness said a security officer confronted the woman, Jazmine Headley, who had sat on the floor of the crowded office for two hours because of a lack of chairs. Police were called when she refused to leave.

The woman ended up lying face-up on the floor during a tug of war over the child.

“The baby was screaming for his life,” Nyashia Ferguson, who posted the video, told The New York Times. “The lady was begging for them to get off of her. I was scared.”

Other customers in the city office shouted at the officers. At one point, an officer can be seen on the video pulling her stun gun and pointing it at people in the angry crowd.

Headley was charged with obstructing governmental administration, resisting arrest, endangering the welfare of a child and trespassing. She was still in jail because there was a warrant for her arrest in New Jersey.

“We did not request any bail and Ms. Headley’s hold is in connection with a warrant from New Jersey,” the Brooklyn prosecutor’s office said. “We are reaching out to authorities in that state to expedite her release.”

Mayor Bill de Blasio ignored a reporter’s shouted question Monday morning if he had seen the video. He tweeted later in the day, calling it a “disturbing incident.”

“Like anyone who’s watched this video, I have a lot of questions about how this was handled,” he posted. “NYPD & HRA will get to the bottom of what happened.”

The Brooklyn public defender’s office called on prosecutors to dismiss the charges, asking “why police were ever involved.”

“In our experience, people are often treated abysmally when seeking support from many of the city bureaucracies that are supposed to be helping them,” Lisa Schreibersdorf, executive director of Brooklyn Defender Services, said in a statement that echoed the complaints of public assistance clients.

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, a Democrat, likened the officers involved in Headley’s arrest to “Border Patrol police snatching away” a baby. He called the arrest “a blemish on our entire city.”

“The mother didn’t endanger the welfare of the child. The actions of the department endangered the welfare of the child,” Adams said at a news conference Monday morning. “If it’s wrong in Mexico, then it’s wrong in New York City.”

The Brooklyn district attorney’s office said it was “reviewing all available videos and interviewing witnesses with the intention of reaching a swift decision.”

The NYPD, which called Friday’s confrontation “troubling,” said security guards had “brought the woman to the floor” before officers arrested her.

Ferguson disputed that, saying a police officer had forced the woman to the floor.

A court document said the toddler was just under 18 months old. A family member was taking care of the child.

“Being poor is not a crime,” said Letitia James, the city’s public advocate and the state’s attorney general-elect. “No mother should have to experience the trauma and humiliation we all witnessed in this video.”

Assistance recipients are treated as burdens and looked down on, said Karen Blondel, 56, a former client at the Brooklyn office, said. “It’s absolutely inhumane,” she said, adding that workers should not be judgmental. “It’s about who’s eligible.”

Jeremy Friedman, 32, a massage therapist who has received food stamps, said it’s important to examine the NYPD’s actions and also those of the Human Resources Administration, where he said he was “treated like I’m not even human.”

Jennifer Roman, 33, said she works but has used public benefits for 13 years. She went to the Brooklyn office for the first time Monday after moving to the neighborhood from the Bronx.

There’s a systemwide problem of disrespect, Roman said, and she was not surprised by what the video showed.

There’s a perception, she said, that “since we need help, we’re no good, we’re scum.”