Clinton Blasts Trump’s Comments on Military Generals, Putin

WHITE PLAINS, New York (AP) -
The motorcade carrying Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives to appear on a NBC Commander-In-Chief Forum held at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space museum aboard the decommissioned aircraft carrier Intrepid, New York, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
The motorcade carrying Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives to appear on an NBC Commander in Chief Forum held at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space museum aboard the decommissioned aircraft carrier Intrepid, in New York, Wednesday. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary Clinton blasted Donald Trump Thursday for his condemnation of American military generals and his praise for Russian President Vladimir Putin, saying he has “failed” at proving he can be commander in chief.

“Every Republican holding or seeking office in this country should be asked if they agree with Donald Trump about these statements,” Clinton said in a morning news conference.

Clinton’s remarks followed a Wednesday night national security forum where the presidential candidates made back-to-back appearances.

The Democrat was repeatedly challenged on her controversial e-mail use at the State Department and her vote as a senator for the 2003 invasion of Iraq. She also fleshed out several national security priorities if she is elected, including trying to take out the leader of the Islamic State and vowing to defeat the terror group without putting U.S. troops on the ground in Iraq or Syria.

Trump did little to counter the criticism that he lacks detailed policy proposals, particularly regarding the Islamic State terror group. He both insisted he has a private blueprint for defeating the terror group and that he would demand a plan from military leaders within 30 days of taking office.

But he was also harshly critical of the military, saying America’s generals have been “reduced to rubble” under Obama. Asked to square his request for military options with that criticism, Trump said simply: “They’ll probably be different generals.”

The Republican also renewed his praise for Putin and his disdain for President Barack Obama, saying that the Russian enjoyed an 82-percent approval rating. “The man has very strong control over a country,” Trump said. “It’s a very different system and I don’t happen to like the system, but certainly, in that system, he’s been a leader, far more than our president has been a leader.”

Speaking to reporters Thursday morning, Clinton suggested she agreed with Democrats who say she is being held to a different standard in the White House race.

“I don’t understand the reasons for it,” she said. “I find it frustrating, but it’s part of the landscape we live in.”

Wednesday’s forum served as a preview of sorts for Clinton and Trump’s highly anticipated presidential debates. The candidates will face off for the first time on Sept. 26 at Hofstra University.

By virtue of a coin flip, Clinton took the stage first and quickly found herself responding at length to questions about her years in government. She reiterated that she had made mistakes in relying on a personal e-mail account and private server as secretary of state and in voting for the 2003 invasion of Iraq as a senator. But she defended her support for U.S. military intervention to help oust a dictator in Libya, despite the chaotic aftermath.

“I’m asking to be judged on the totality of my record,” said Clinton, who grew visibly irritated at times with the repeated focus on her past actions.

Clinton, who has cast Trump as dangerously ill prepared to be commander in chief, tried to center the discussion on her foreign policy proposals. She vowed to defeat the Islamic State group “without committing American ground troops” to Iraq or Syria. And she pledged to hold weekly Oval Office meetings with representatives from the Pentagon and Department of Veterans Affairs to stay abreast of health care for veterans.

Trump for the first time opened the door to granting legal status to people living in the U.S. illegally who join the military. “I think that when you serve in the armed forces, that’s a very special situation,” Trump said. “And I could see myself working that out.”

With just two months until Election Day, national security has emerged as a centerpiece issue in the White House race. Both candidates believe they have the upper hand, with Clinton contrasting her experience with Trump’s unpredictability and the Republican arguing that Americans worried about their safety will be left with more of the same if they elect Obama’s former secretary of state.

While GOP candidates are often seen by voters as having an advantage on military and national security issues, Trump is far from a traditional Republican. He has no military experience and has repeatedly criticized the skill of the armed forces.