Clinton Announces Transition Leadership Should She Win in November

NEW YORK (Reuters) -
A worker takes a light meter reading ahead of the election night rally for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the New York presidential primary election in New York City, U.S., April 19, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar SEARCH "ELECTION SIDELINES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A worker takes a light meter reading ahead of the election night rally for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in New York City in April. (Reuters/Mike Segar)

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s campaign on Tuesday named a leadership line-up for her transition team, which will prepare the way should she win the November election.

Ken Salazar, previously both a secretary of the interior and a Colorado senator, will chair the team, known formally as the Clinton-Kaine Transition Project, for Clinton and her running mate, Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia.

The announcement comes as Clinton has gained momentum in the polls against Republican rival Donald Trump, whose campaign has struggled after a string of controversial remarks.

The team will include four co-chairs, according to a statement: former National Security Adviser Tom Donilon, former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm, president of the Center for American Progress Neera Tanden, and Maggie Williams, director of Harvard’s Institute of Politics.

Two policy advisers on the campaign, Ed Meier and Ann O’Leary, will also move full-time to the transition team.

Heather Boushey, the executive director of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, will be the chief economist.

The team includes strong ties to the Clinton campaign. Tanden, for example, is a longtime Clinton confidante, and Boushey has advised the campaign on economic policy.

Clinton led Trump by more than 5 percentage points in the Reuters/Ipsos tracking poll released on Friday.

Many establishment Republicans, alarmed by the steady flow of controversial remarks, have distanced themselves from Trump in recent weeks.

In May, Trump picked New Jersey Governor Chris Christie to head his own transition team.