MTA Admits Fault for Inaccurate LIRR Alerts After Blizzard

NEW YORK (AP) -
At the Port Washington branch of the Long Island Railroad, a train covered in snow stands still during the morning rush hour as service is suspended on the Port Washington branch due to the recent snowstorm on Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 in Port Washington, N.Y. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
At the Port Washington branch of the Long Island Railroad, a train covered in snow stands still during the morning rush hour as service is suspended on the branch due to Monday’s snowstorm. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority is taking the blame for some of the confusion in communication LIRR riders experienced during and after the snowstorm.

MTA Vice Chairman Fernando Ferrer said Wednesday the agency was trying to learn from the experience. Newsday reports that he said that some confusion riders felt was “our fault.”

The railroad suspended service Saturday afternoon due to two feet of snowfall and frozen track switches.

MTA on Sunday said seven LIRR branches would be operational by 5 a.m. the next morning. But the agency around that time delayed trains two more hours — some until the afternoon. All service was restored Tuesday morning.

LIRR now faces questions of conflicting and inaccurate alerts provided to commuters. The agency is expected to release a storm response report next month.