Iran Expects Final IAEA Nuclear Report on Friday

DUBAI (Reuters) -
FILE - In this March 5, 2013, file photo, a view of the U.N. building with the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, office inside, at the International Center, in Vienna, Austria. Iran has agreed to cooperate with the U.N. in answering longstanding allegations about possible past work to develop nuclear weapons at its Parchin plant, but only with the Iranians conducting the inspections themselves. A draft of the Parchin document, as seen by The Associated Press, essentially cedes the Parchin inspection to Iran, allowing it to collect its own environmental samples on the site and carry out other work usually done by IAEA experts. The IAEA will be able to review the Iranians’ work after the fact. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak, File)
The U.N. building with the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, office inside, at the International Center in Vienna, Austria. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak, File)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is expected to issue its final report on Friday to confirm Iran has met all its obligations under the nuclear deal, Iran’s deputy foreign minister said on Wednesday.

“The IAEA will issue its final report on Friday to confirm Iran has met its committments under the JCPOA [nuclear deal],” Iran’s Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araqchi was quoted as saying by the Fars news agency.

He added that Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and Federica Mogherini, the European Union’s representative for foreign affairs, would issue a joint statement on Saturday or Sunday regarding implementation of the deal and sanctions being lifted.

The IAEA declined to comment on the report.

A report by the U.N. nuclear watchdog saying Iran has kept its promises under the nuclear deal is a crucial precondition for sanctions relief to kick in. The IAEA will, however, continue to regularly report to its member states on Iran.

Under the agreement reached in July 2015, Tehran promised to reduce its stockpile of low-enriched uranium to below 300 kg (660 pounds), cut the number of its installed uranium-enriching centrifuges to around 6,100 from 19,000, and decommission the Arak heavy water reactor.

On Tuesday, the spokesman for Iran’s atomic energy agency said IAEA inspectors had arrived in Iran to verify the final steps.

“The technical work under way is very demanding, but the Atomic Energy Agency of Iran has been trying to do it as fast as possible,” Behrouz Kamalvandi was quoted as saying by the Tasnim news agency.