Polish Explorer Says He’s Found Alleged Nazi Shelter

WARSAW, Poland (AP/Hamodia) -
An evacuation tunnel, leading to massive shelters that are part of a giant system of tunnels and bunkers, under Ksiaz Castle in Walbrzych, Poland, Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015. The Nazis most probably built it for Hitler.  (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
An evacuation tunnel, leading to massive shelters that are part of a giant system of tunnels and bunkers, under Ksiaz Castle in Walbrzych, Poland, Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015. The Nazis most probably built it for Hitler. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
The abandoned building of a German Nazi-era railway installation in Walim, near Walbrzych, in Poland. (AP Photo)
The abandoned building of a German Nazi-era railway installation in Walim, near Walbrzych, in Poland. (AP Photo)
Explorer Krzysztof Szpakowski (R) with his legal advisor, at a news conference at the provincial governor’s office in Walbrzych, Poland. (AP Photo)
Explorer Krzysztof Szpakowski (R) with his legal advisor, at a news conference at the provincial governor’s office in Walbrzych, Poland. (AP Photo)

A Polish explorer claimed Friday he has found a massive underground structure in southwestern Poland that, he says, the Nazis built and that has the capacity to protect thousands of people.

Krzysztof Szpakowski told a news conference that he has no doubt as to his find, which he says was based on evidence he has been gathering for decades, including witness statements, old documents and an examination of the area by ground-penetrating radar and by dowsers.

Szpakowski said the structure was part of the “Riese” (giant) system of railway tunnels, corridors and shelters that the Nazis were building during World War II in the mountains around the city of Walbrzych. The original purpose of the tunnel complex is a subject of great speculation among historians and conspiracy theorists alike. Conjectures include a planned shelter and headquarters for Hitler or a staging ground for testing clandestine military technologies.

He said that anything from technical appliances to armaments could be inside, but “not a gold train.”

His conference was hosted by Walbrzych regional authorities, who said they have officially registered his information and are seeking state funds for the exploration.

Last month, two other men sparked a gold rush by claiming they found a tunnel at a separate location in Walbrzych that contains a Nazi train that could be carrying valuables. Now they say it could be rather precious minerals for the war industry. Nothing has been found yet.

Historians say there are dozens of miles of tunnels and only 10 percent of them have been uncovered. No documents have been found to indicate their overall purpose, but they have attracted explorers and inspired legends of a hidden Nazi train laden with gold.

The region was in Germany until the war’s end and then became part of Poland. The Red Army resided in the area for some 18 months after the war before handing it over to the Poles.