Terror Victim Dies of Wounds In Hospital

YERUSHALAYIM -
Yair Hofer, one of the survivors of the attack near Shilo, at Shaarei Zedek Hospital. (Hadas Parush/Flash90)
Yair Hofer, one of the survivors of the attack near Shilo, at Shaarei Zedek Hospital. (Hadas Parush/Flash90)

Malachi Moshe Rosenfeld, Hy”d, died Tuesday of multiple gunshot wounds inflicted in a drive-by terrorist attack on Monday night in the Shomron.

Three other Israeli victims of the shootings, all in their twenties, were reportedly recovering from light to moderate wounds at Shaarei Zedek and Hadassah hospitals in Yerushalayim. (Initial reports that said there were only three hurt were incorrect.)

An IDF manhunt for the perpetrators continued in the area, though there were no reports of any arrests as of Tuesday night.

Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon said on Tuesday that the incident in Shilo and some of the recent so-called “lone wolf” terror attacks have in fact been directed from Hamas’s international headquarters in Istanbul and funded by Iran.

The IDF announced a reinforced presence in Yehudah and Shomron, bolstering existing forces with an additional infantry battalion from the Nahal Brigade, in response to the recent upswing in anti-Jewish violence.

However, family and friends were voicing, along with great sadness at the death of the their loved one, frustration and anger at the lack of security in the region.

Rosenfeld’s parents, Eliezer and Sarah, made an appeal on Tuesday to the “security forces, and those whose job it is, to do as all free countries do and provide us with security.” So far, they said, there have been “no appropriate responses” to the recent series of attacks.

For the Rosenfelds it was the second tragic loss of a son. Malachi’s older brother died on a trip to Tze’elim Stream in the Judean Desert in 2002. “Malachi took the big brother role upon himself. He had a lot of love to give the younger children in the family,” they said.

In an interview with Hamodia, Mrs. Rachael Kaplan, a neighbor of the Rosenfelds in Kochav HaShachar, where the niftar was from, described the scene there as “very sad and very angry.”

The shooting took place on the Alon road near Shilo, less than 20 minutes from Kochav HaShachar, where she lives.

“The trees go right up to the edge of the highway,” providing cover for ambushers and an easy escape route into nearby Arab villages, but “the army won’t do anything,” they won’t cut back the trees, she said, even though they stand on public land.

Mrs. Kaplan, who moved to Kochav HaShachar only six weeks ago, admitted that she might be more “shaken up than most people here … but that there is a real feeling of injustice.”

 

Eliezer Rosenfeld embraces his son’s friend, Yair Hofer, at Shaarei Zedek Hospital, where he was hospitalized after being shot in Monday night’s terror attack. (Hadas Parush/Flash90)
Eliezer Rosenfeld embraces his son’s friend, Yair Hofer, at Shaarei Zedek Hospital, where he was hospitalized after being shot in Monday night’s terror attack. (Hadas Parush/Flash90)

She added, however, that “it’s important not be afraid; it’s all in Hashem’s hands.”

Most of the community of 300 to 400 families came out Tuesday night for a demonstration to protest the lack of security.

The local leadership published a statement saying: “The entire community embraces, with pain and warmth, the Rosenfeld family, and the families of the wounded, and is united in prayer for their recovery. In these difficult hours, we will strengthen each other, together with one heart.”

In recognition of the strong emotions prevailing in the wake of the deadly attack, they also called for restraint: “We ask resolutely to avoid revenge acts, which only weaken and deflect public attention from the justice of our struggle.”

Rosenfeld’s levayah is scheduled for Wednesday.

More details of the attack were emerging. An initial investigation found that two terrorists perpetrated the ambush in a car with Palestinian plates on the Alon road. Shortly before 11:00 p.m., the terrorists saw an Israeli vehicle traveling their way and opened fire at the front of the car from short-range. At least 15 nine-millimeter bullets hit the Israeli car.

The terrorists continued firing at the vehicle even after the driver made a sharp turn towards Migdalim. He came to a stop after a few hundred feet and called for help.

The terrorists fled the scene in their car. Palestinians have complete freedom of movement on this road, as on all other main roads in Yehudah and Shomron.

“A vehicle was slowly driving in front of us, and suddenly we heard the shots and realized we were being shot at,” said Yair Hofer, who was lightly wounded.

“Thank G-d we were a few yards away from the junction. It’s possible that if I had been driving, we would have been closer to the junction and it would have been easier for them to aim … When they were done they didn’t drive very fast, they drove slowly. I think they were debating whether to leave the vehicle. I crawled outside through the window.

“When the shots start you just curl up and try to protect your head. I will never forget the feeling, it’s just helplessness. When someone decides to try to take your life, and you didn’t do anything to him; [he] decided to try taking your life because he realized you’re a Jew. And you’re helpless…”

Malachi Moshe Rosenfeld, Hy”d, died Tuesday of multiple gunshot wounds inflicted in a drive-by terrorist attack on Monday night in the Shomron.

Three other Israeli victims of the shootings, all in their twenties, were reportedly recovering from light to moderate wounds at Shaarei Zedek and Hadassah hospitals in Yerushalayim. (Initial reports that said there were only three hurt were incorrect.)

An IDF manhunt for the perpetrators continued in the area, though there were no reports of any arrests as of Tuesday night.

Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon said on Tuesday that the incident in Shilo and some of the recent so-called “lone wolf” terror attacks have in fact been directed from Hamas’s international headquarters in Istanbul and funded by Iran.

The IDF announced a reinforced presence in Yehudah and Shomron, bolstering existing forces with an additional infantry battalion from the Nahal Brigade, in response to the recent upswing in anti-Jewish violence.

However, family and friends were voicing, along with great sadness at the death of the their loved one, frustration and anger at the lack of security in the region.

Rosenfeld’s parents, Eliezer and Sarah, made an appeal on Tuesday to the “security forces, and those whose job it is, to do as all free countries do and provide us with security.” So far, they said, there have been “no appropriate responses” to the recent series of attacks.

For the Rosenfelds it was the second tragic loss of a son. Malachi’s older brother died on a trip to Tze’elim Stream in the Judean Desert in 2002. “Malachi took the big brother role upon himself. He had a lot of love to give the younger children in the family,” they said.

In an interview with Hamodia, Mrs. Rachael Kaplan, a neighbor of the Rosenfelds in Kochav HaShachar, where the niftar was from, described the scene there as “very sad and very angry.”

The shooting took place on the Alon road near Shilo, less than 20 minutes from Kochav HaShachar, where she lives.

“The trees go right up to the edge of the highway,” providing cover for ambushers and an easy escape route into nearby Arab villages, but “the army won’t do anything,” they won’t cut back the trees, she said, even though they stand on public land.

Dr. Ofer Marin, head of the Emergency Unit at Shaarei Zedek Hospital, briefing reporters after Monday night’s terror attack. The doctors struggled to save Malachi Moshe Rosenfeld, Hy”d, but he succumbed to his wounds. (Hadas Parush/Flash90)
Dr. Ofer Marin, head of the Emergency Unit at Shaarei Zedek Hospital, briefing reporters after Monday night’s terror attack. The doctors struggled to save Malachi Moshe Rosenfeld, Hy”d, but he succumbed to his wounds. (Hadas Parush/Flash90)

 

 

Mrs. Kaplan, who moved to Kochav HaShachar only six weeks ago, admitted that she might be more “shaken up than most people here … but that there is a real feeling of injustice.”

She added, however, that “it’s important not be afraid; it’s all in Hashem’s hands.”

Most of the community of 300 to 400 families came out Tuesday night for a demonstration to protest the lack of security.

The local leadership published a statement saying: “The entire community embraces, with pain and warmth, the Rosenfeld family, and the families of the wounded, and is united in prayer for their recovery. In these difficult hours, we will strengthen each other, together with one heart.”

In recognition of the strong emotions prevailing in the wake of the deadly attack, they also called for restraint: “We ask resolutely to avoid revenge acts, which only weaken and deflect public attention from the justice of our struggle.”

Rosenfeld’s levayah is scheduled for Wednesday.

More details of the attack were emerging. An initial investigation found that two terrorists perpetrated the ambush in a car with Palestinian plates on the Alon road. Shortly before 11:00 p.m., the terrorists saw an Israeli vehicle traveling their way and opened fire at the front of the car from short-range. At least 15 nine-millimeter  bullets hit the Israeli car.

The terrorists continued firing at the vehicle even after the driver made a sharp turn towards Migdalim. He came to a stop after a few hundred feet and called for help.

The terrorists fled the scene in their car. Palestinians have complete freedom of movement on this road, as on all other main roads in Yehudah and Shomron.

“A vehicle was slowly driving in front of us, and suddenly we heard the shots and realized we were being shot at,” said Yair Hofer, who was lightly wounded.

“Thank G-d we were a few yards away from the junction. It’s possible that if I had been driving, we would have been closer to the junction and it would have been easier for them to aim … When they were done they didn’t drive very fast, they drove slowly. I think they were debating whether to leave the vehicle. I crawled outside through the window.

“When the shots start you just curl up and try to protect your head. I will never forget the feeling, it’s just helplessness. When someone decides to try to take your life, and you didn’t do anything to him; [he] decided to try taking your life because he realized you’re a Jew. And you’re helpless…”