‘Manifesto’ Linked to Dylann Roof Found

COLUMBIA, S.C. (The State/TNS) -
A sign of support is pictured at a makeshift memorial at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston. (REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)
A sign of support is pictured at a makeshift memorial at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston. (REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)
Dylann Roof appears via video before Judge James Gosnell during a bond hearing at a court in North Charleston, S.C. on Friday.  (Centralized Bond Hearing Court, of Charleston, S.C. via AP)
Dylann Roof appears via video before Judge James Gosnell during a bond hearing at a court in North Charleston, S.C. on Friday. (Centralized Bond Hearing Court, of Charleston, S.C. via AP)

An alleged manifesto of sorts purportedly belonging to accused Charleston killer Dylann Storm Roof surfaced Saturday.

The manifesto is laden with racially inflammatory language.

It is unclear whether Roof himself wrote or posted the text, but there are fresh photographs that appear to be Roof.

The writer also describes why Charleston was chosen for the attacks.

“I chose Charleston because it is [the] most historic city in my state, and at one time had the highest ratio of blacks to Whites in the country. We have no skinheads, no real KKK, no one doing anything but talking on the internet. Well someone has to have the bravery to take it to the real world, and I guess that has to be me.”

In nearly all the photographs where his face is visible, Roof is serious and unsmiling.

In one photograph, he is sitting on a stool in a garden, surrounded by flowers, holding a Confederate flag in one hand and a .45 caliber handgun in the other.

The gun is similar to the one said to have been used in the murder of nine blacks in a Charleston church last week.

In another photo, Roof is shown in a beach scene with the numbers “1488” written in the sand. According to the Anti-Defamation League and other sources, the number “14” is a reference to what white supremacists call “the 14 words.” Those words are, “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children” — words attributed to George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party. The number “88” is shorthand for Heil Hitler — H being the eighth letter of the alphabet, according to the Anti-Defamation League and others.

In what appears to be a chilling 2,000-plus word manifesto, Roof tells why he believes blacks are inferior to whites, how they were happy when they lived under slavery and how whites need to take the country back. Blacks are “the biggest problem of America,” he writes.

Roof also targets Jews and Latinos, writing of Latinos that even though many are white, “They are still our enemies.” Of Jews, Roof writes, they are responsible for “agitation of the black race.”

As for patriotism, Roof writes, “I hate the sight of the American flag.”

Meanwhile on Sunday, hundreds of people packed a sweltering Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston for an emotional memorial service remembering those killed on Wednesday.

Outside the church, a large, mostly white crowd gathered to express solidarity with those inside.