Baltimore Police Give Report On Death to Prosecutor

BALTIMORE (AP) -

Police completed their investigation into the death of Freddie Gray a day earlier than planned Thursday and delivered it to the chief prosecutor in Baltimore, who pleaded for patience and peace while she decides whether to bring charges.

The deputy commissioner also revealed a new detail that raises still more questions about what the officers involved have told investigators: He said the van carrying Gray to the police station made a previously undisclosed stop that was captured on video by a “privately owned camera.”

State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby must review the evidence, consider charges and decide how to move forward in the death of Gray, who suffered severe spinal injuries at some point after he tried to run from police on April 12, and died a week later.

Police Commissioner Anthony Batts took no questions and provided no details about the report, which he said represents the work of more than 30 investigators. Questions about the case must now go to Mosby, he said.

“I understand the frustration; I understand the sense of urgency,” Batts said. “That is why we have finished it a day ahead of time.”

In all, the previously undisclosed stop now makes four stops between the time officers arrested Gray and his arrival at a police station, where he was found unresponsive. He was hospitalized in critical condition and died a week later. Gray was arrested after he made eye contact with an officer and ran. Officers chased him down and handcuffed him behind his back.

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake sought to dispel any notion that the police report would bring a swift and public conclusion to the case. “Whatever time the state’s attorney’s office needs to make that determination, the family wants to get it right,” she said Wednesday after meeting with Gray’s family and legal team.