Lawmakers Seek to End Benefits to Former Nazis

WASHINGTON (AP) -

Legislation to stop suspected Nazi war criminals from receiving Social Security benefits will be introduced soon, members of Congress announced Thursday, the latest response to an Associated Press investigation that revealed millions of dollars have been paid to former Nazis who were forced out of the United States.

A bill crafted by Sens. Chuck Schumer of New York and Bob Casey of Pennsylvania will be offered in mid-November, when Congress returns to session following the midterm elections. House lawmakers said they are working on similar legislation.

The AP’s investigation, published Sunday, has triggered outrage on Capitol Hill, in the editorial pages of newspapers across the country, and from the White House, which said former Nazis should not be getting Social Security benefits.

“It is simply perverse that these criminals have been able to live comfortably abroad thanks to the American taxpayer,” Schumer said.

The Justice Department used a legal loophole to persuade Nazi suspects to leave the U.S. in exchange for Social Security benefits. If they agreed to go, or simply fled before being deported, they could keep their Social Security benefits, the AP found. The Justice Department denied using Social Security payments as a tool for expelling Nazi suspects.