Greenfield’s Law Slows Drivers Near Schools

BROOKLYN -
Councilman David Greenfield addressing the bill-signing ceremony on Monday by Mayor Bill de Blasio, at a Queens public school.
Councilman David Greenfield addressing the bill-signing ceremony on Monday by Mayor Bill de Blasio, at a Queens public school.

Crucial traffic safety legislation introduced by Councilman David Greenfield was one of 12 traffic bills signed into law by Mayor Bill de Blasio on Monday, at PS 152 in Queens, where eight-year-old Noshat Nahian was killed by a tractor-trailer in December while walking to school.

The bill, an essential piece of New York City’s Vision Zero traffic initiative, establishes 50 new “slow zones” per year near schools and creates seven new neighborhood slow zones at the request of the community.

“It’s not every day that you get to pass laws that will literally save lives,” Greenfield said. “…The fact is that by slowing down, we will literally save our friends’ and neighbors’ lives.”

Approximately 250 people are killed and 4,000 seriously injured every year in crashes, the majority of whom  are pedestrians.

Greenfield has also urged the NYPD to increase the number of school crossing guards at dangerous street corners and asked the city to add important safety measures like more pedestrian countdown signals and flashing warning lights to warn large trucks of low underpasses.

Greenfield’s legislation will establish 50 “school slow zones” of up to 1,300 feet from the entrance or exit of a school. At designated “school slow zones,” the speed will be no less than 15 mph and no more than 20 mph. Additionally, seven more “neighborhood slow zones,” no more than five blocks long, will be established, designating the speed limit at 20 mph.

If you have a recommendation on a school that you would like to see included in this new “slow zone” initiative, please call Councilman Greenfield’s office at (718) 853-2704.