Britain’s Foreign Secretary Cautions Against Undermining Iran Deal

LONDON (Reuters) -
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (R) speaks to the media as British Foreign Secretary William Hague (L) and Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zeidan stand alongside him at the Winfield House, the residence of the U.S. Ambassador to Britain, in London, on Sunday. Kerry arrived to meet British and Libyan officials after taking part in the talks curbing Iran’s nuclear activity. (REUTERS/Carolyn Kaster/Pool)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (R) speaks to the media as British Foreign Secretary William Hague (L) and Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zeidan stand alongside him at the Winfield House, the residence of the U.S. Ambassador to Britain, in London, on Sunday. Kerry arrived to meet British and Libyan officials after taking part in the talks curbing Iran’s nuclear activity. (REUTERS/Carolyn Kaster/Pool)

Britain’s Foreign Secretary William Hague said on Monday that Israel should avoid taking any action that would undermine the interim nuclear agreement reached between Iran and world powers at the weekend.

Urging world leaders to give the interim deal a chance, Hague said it was important to try to understand those who opposed the agreement. But he urged Israel and others to confine their criticism to rhetoric.

“We would discourage anybody in the world, including Israel, from taking any steps that would undermine this agreement and we will make that very clear to all concerned,” Hague told parliament.

Foreign Minister of France, Laurent Fabius. (Photo Marc Israel Sellem/Pool/Flash90)
Foreign Minister of France, Laurent Fabius. (Photo Marc Israel Sellem/Pool/Flash90)

Hague added that he had not seen any sign that any country opposed to the agreement would try to disrupt it “in any practical way.” But he said Britain would be “on its guard.”

Hague told parliament he hoped a comprehensive nuclear agreement with Tehran could be reached within a year, but warned that world powers could swiftly reverse any sanctions relief they had granted Iran if Tehran reneged on the deal.

Also on Monday, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said that he did not believe Israel would launch a preemptive military strike on Iran’s nuclear installations, Israel Radio reported.