Obama Makes “Last-Ditch” Push On Gun Control in Connecticut

WASHINGTON (Reuters) -
Marine One is seen arriving through the Magnolia tree before picking up U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington Monday, before his departure for a day trip to Connecticut. (REUTERS/Larry Downing)
Marine One is seen arriving through the Magnolia tree before picking up U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington Monday, before his departure for a day trip to Connecticut. (REUTERS/Larry Downing)

President Barack Obama was set to make a fresh plea on Monday for a reluctant Congress to pass new gun control legislation — one of his top domestic policy priorities — as he travels to Connecticut, where December’s school massacre took place.

Initial momentum for tougher gun control laws sought by Obama after the December 14 shootings in Newtown, Connecticut, has stalled in Congress in the face of fierce lobbying by gun rights groups like the National Rifle Association.

Obama, who spoke at the University of Hartford on Monday, is hoping to build support among lawmakers for several gun control measures, including universal background checks for gun buyers. The Senate is expected to take up gun control legislation as early as this week.

The president has invited 11 parents of children killed in Newtown to fly back to Washington with him aboard Air Force One after his speech. The parents are set to lobby Congress this week for gun control measures, although it may be too late to rescue major legislation sought by Obama.

The president had vowed to use all the powers of his office to reduce gun violence after a gunman killed 20 children and six adults on December 14 at an elementary school in Newtown.

No major gun legislation has passed the U.S. Congress since 1994.

Some of Obama’s gun control proposals — reinstating a U.S. ban on assault weapons and cracking down on high-capacity ammunition clips — already appear to have little chance of passing the Democratic-led Senate, let alone the Republican-controlled House of Representatives.

Obama is hoping to salvage the proposal for background checks on all gun buyers to try to ensure that criminals and others prohibited from buying firearms cannot get them. There are not yet enough votes in the Senate for expanded background checks as Democrats seek Republican votes.

White House spokesman Jay Carney held out hope.

“We are working with those on Capitol Hill who are working towards solutions to the legislative priorities the president laid out. Closing the loopholes in our background check system is a major priority,” Carney told reporters.