Venezuelan Leader, Chavez, Dies at 58

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) -
Venezuela’s Vice President Nicolas Maduro, second from left, addresses the nation from Miraflores presidential palace during a meeting in Caracas, Venezuela, Tuesday, before Chavez’s death. At left is Governor Adan Chavez, the older brother of President Hugo Chavez. Maduro met with top Venezuelan government ministers, the military high command and all 20 loyalist governors in Caracas. Foreign Minister Elias Jaua sits third from right. (AP Photo/Miraflores Presidential Press Office)
Venezuela’s Vice President Nicolas Maduro, second from left, addresses the nation from Miraflores presidential palace during a meeting in Caracas, Venezuela, Tuesday, before Chavez’s death. At left is Governor Adan Chavez, the older brother of President Hugo Chavez. Maduro met with top Venezuelan government ministers, the military high command and all 20 loyalist governors in Caracas. Foreign Minister Elias Jaua sits third from right. (AP Photo/Miraflores Presidential Press Office)

President Hugo Chavez, the fiery populist who declared a socialist revolution in Venezuela, crusaded against U.S. influence and championed a leftist revival across Latin America, died Tuesday at age 58 after a nearly two-year bout with cancer.

During more than 14 years in office, Chavez routinely challenged the status quo at home and internationally. He polarized Venezuelans with his confrontational and domineering style, yet was also a masterful communicator and strategist who tapped into Venezuelan nationalism to win broad support, particularly among the poor.

Vice President Nicolas Maduro, surrounded by other government officials, announced the death in a national broadcast. He said Chavez died at 4:25 p.m. local time.

Chavez repeatedly proved himself a political survivor. As an army paratroop commander, he led a failed coup in 1992, then was pardoned and elected president in 1998. He survived a coup against his own presidency in 2002 and won re-election two more times.

The burly president electrified crowds with his booming voice, often wearing the bright red of his United Socialist Party of Venezuela or the fatigues and red beret of his army days.

Chavez used his country’s vast oil wealth to launch social programs that include state-run food markets, new public housing, free health clinics and education programs. Poverty declined during Chavez’s presidency amid a historic boom in oil earnings, but critics said he failed to use the windfall of hundreds of billions of dollars to develop the country’s economy.

Inflation soared and the homicide rate rose to among the highest in the world.

He was also inspired by Cuban leader Fidel Castro and took on the aging revolutionary’s role as Washington’s chief antagonist in the Western Hemisphere after Castro relinquished the presidency to his brother Raul in 2006.

He would lambast his opponents as “oligarchs,” announce expropriations of companies and lecture Venezuelans about the glories of socialism.

Critics saw Chavez as a typical Latin American caudillo, a strongman who ruled through force of personality and showed disdain for democratic rules. Chavez concentrated power in his hands with allies who dominated the congress and justices who controlled the Supreme Court.

He insisted all the while that Venezuela remained a vibrant democracy and denied trying to restrict free speech. But some opponents faced criminal charges and were driven into exile.

While Chavez trumpeted plans for communes and an egalitarian society, his soaring rhetoric regularly conflicted with reality. Despite government seizures of companies and farmland, the balance between Venezuela’s public and private sectors changed little during his presidency.

And even as the poor saw their incomes rise, those gains were blunted while the country’s currency weakened amid economic controls.