2013 Elections: The Final Vote Count

YERUSHALAYIM -
Elyakim Rubinstein, head of the Israeli Central Election Committee, counts the remaining ballots of soldiers and absentees at the Knesset on Thursday. (FLASH90)
Elyakim Rubinstein, head of the Israeli Central Election Committee, counts the remaining ballots of soldiers and absentees at the Knesset on Thursday. (FLASH90)

There were some late winners and losers as the Central Election Committee concluded the official counting of votes on Thursday afternoon, resolving the exact composition of the 19th Knesset.

Large numbers of “double-envelope votes” — so called because the voters are listed in their army base or hospital, as well as in their hometown — were finally merged with the overall national vote. It takes longer to count them than regular ballots because the CEC must check to make sure that no one voted twice.

The votes of 200,000 soldiers, plus those of prisoners and people in hospitals, were included.

Israelis counting the remaining ballots of soldiers and absentees by hand on Thursday. (FLASH90)
Israelis counting the remaining ballots of soldiers and absentees by hand on Thursday. (FLASH90)

Jewish Home received an additional seat, bringing its total to 12 seats; Kadima cheated oblivion with 2 seats; and the Arab Raam-Taal party dropped from 5 to 4, officials said.

The final count: Likud 31, Yesh Atid 19, Labor 15, Jewish Home 12, Shas 11, United Torah Judaism 7, Meretz 6, Tzipi Livni 6, the three Arab parties a total of 11, and Kadima 2.

The right bloc has 61 seats and the center-left bloc 59, according to a Jerusalem Post assessment.