Holocaust Survivors Speak

Mrs. Hindu Fischer (Part III)

After having survived for three months in Auschwitz, where were you transported to? We were then taken to an ammunition factory. My sister saw to it that I was given…

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Mrs. Hindu Fischer (Part II)

How long were you in the ghetto? We remained in the ghetto for six weeks before it was liquidated. Then we were shoved into cattle wagons — wagons used for…

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Mrs. Hindu Fischer (Part I)

Can you tell me where you were born? I, Hinda Fischer, née Kleinman, was born on February 13, 1930, in the town of Chust, Czechoslovakia. Chust had a population of…

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Faye Lehrer-Tusk (Part III)

In 1942, the Polish government made a pact with Russia and we were free to leave. We had to register to travel. We didn’t know where to go. My brother…

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Faye Lehrer-Tusk (Part II)

It wasn’t long before word began to spread that the Russians were backing out and the Germans were taking over again. People began to run. However, many were reluctant to…

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Faye Lehrer-Tusk (Part I)

I, Fayga Tusk-Lehrer, née Harcsztark, was born in the city of Tomoshov (Lubelsky), Poland. Tomoshov had a large shul and many shtieblach; a Gerrer shtieblel, a Belzer shtiebel, a Rhizoner…

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Regina Louis (Part II)

When did your liberation begin? After a few months, we heard that the Russians were coming. Everything was chaos. At this point they sent us to Theresienstadt. We stayed there…

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Regina Louis (Part I)

Can you tell me where you were born? I, Regina Louis, was born in Krakow, Poland. I attended a Hebrew school and then continued on to work. I had a…

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Avigdor (Victor) Louis (Part II)

For how long did you remain in the ghettos? In 1943, they decided to clear out the ghettos. Transport trains were brought in, and I was taken together with my…

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Avigdor (Victor) Louis (Part I)

Can you tell me where you were born? I, Avigdor (Victor) Louis, was born in Cracow, Poland. There were many Rabbanim in the town; our family Rav was the Tchechover…

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Mrs. Henna Feintuch (Part III)

Were you taken to work? Sure. We were taken to Germany to work in an ammunition factory. We worked together at one machine. They didn’t know that we were sisters…

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Mrs. Henna Feintuch (Part II)

When did you begin feeling the pressures of war? My brothers were taken away to the Munkatabor (labor camps). My oldest brother, Moshe Hersh, was married and lived with us…

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Mrs. Henna Feintuch (Part I)

Can you tell me where you were born? I, Henna Feintuch née Zoldan, was born in the town of Chust, Czechoslovakia, on November 25, 1923. Chust was considered a very…

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Mrs. Leah-Lilly Klein (Part IV)

Once the Americans announced that you were free, what did you do? Sunday morning we were moved to the Hitler Boarding School, where it was safer. The following day we…

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Mrs. Leah-Lilly Klein (Part III)

How long did you remain in Auschwitz? We were in Auschwitz until the end of October. We were put into cattle wagons again and transported to a city called Fallersleben.…

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Mrs. Leah-Lilly Klein (Part II)

Can you describe ghetto life? The ghetto was situated in the town of Borpatak, near Satmar. Life was very sad. Many Jewish men were beaten for no reason at all.…

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Mrs. Leah-Lilly Klein (Part I)

Can you tell me your name and where you were born? My name is Leah–Lilly Klein, née Levy. I was born in Baia-Sprie/ Felsőbánya. From 1940 to 1945 it was…

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Mrs. Etya Kleinman (Part V)

When I arrived home, my brother Yom Tov Lipa was already there. He, too, had been taken to Auschwitz. Upon entering the house, I saw that everything was gone. The…

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Mrs. Etya Kleinman (Part IV)

After this selection, where were you taken? The group of 500 girls was taken to the Sudetenland on the side of Germany. Here there were bunk beds with two levels,…

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Mrs. Etya Kleinman (Part III)

The next day we were transferred to another barrack, C-19. The Blockalteste was a Polish woman who was in the camps for four or five years already; she was nice…

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